Thursday’s bond market has opened flat again as investors seem to be unmoved by recent economic data. The stock markets are showing losses with the Dow down 30 points and the Nasdaq down 19 points. The bond market is currently down 5/32, but I am not expecting to see much of a change in this morning’s mortgage rates.

Today’s release of the 2nd Quarter Gross Domestic Product (GDP) revision revealed no change to the previous estimate of down 1.0%. Analysts were expecting to see a downward revision to a decline of 1.4%, meaning that the economy was not as weak as some had thought. While this is considered negative news for bonds since it was thought the economy had slowed at a quicker pace than it actually did, the data has not influenced mortgage rates this morning. It could be that this is relatively old news at this point. There is a final revision being released next month, but it often has little impact on bond trading or mortgage rates.

The Labor Department said that 570,000 new claims for unemployment benefits were filed last week. This was close to forecasts and has also had little impact on bond trading or mortgage rates this morning.

Yesterday’s 5-year Treasury Note auction went okay. It was met with an average demand from investors and the other measurements of success were indicated the same. It was not an overly strong auction, but it also didn’t qualify as a poor sale either. Today’s 7-year Note sale is also of interest to mortgage shoppers. The results of it will be posted at 1:00 PM ET. If it was met with a good demand from investors, we could see bond prices rise and mortgage rates drop during afternoon trading. However, a lackluster interest in the sale could lead to bond selling and upward revisions to mortgage rates later today.

Tomorrow brings us the release of two relevant economic reports. The first is July’s Personal Income and Outlays report that measures consumer ability to spend and current spending habits. It is expected to show an increase of 0.1% in income and a 0.2% increase in spending. Weaker than expected numbers would be good news for the bond market and mortgage rates.

August’s revision to the University of Michigan’s Index of Consumer Sentiment is also due tomorrow morning. It gives us a measurement of consumer willingness to spend. It is expected to show a reading of 64.8. If it revises lower, consumers were less confident about their personal financial situations than previously thought. This would be good news for the bond market and mortgage rates.
 


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